'Back to the 1980s': BBC Sunday Politics' verdict on Corbyn's policy initiatives

'Back to the 1980s': BBC Sunday Politics' verdict on Corbyn's policy initiatives



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The Sunday Politics 17 January 2015

order order who are an incorrigible delinquents at times maybe yourself man personally let's talk about Jeremy Corbyn he gave a wide-ranging interview on the marshal a little earlier here on BBC one let's just listen to what the Labour leader had to say my question with respect was about sympathy action and whether you would remove that less empathy action is legal in most other countries and I think it should also be legal here but remember this no you would really although story nobody willingness of course nobody willingly goes on strike they go on strike as an ultimate weapon the number of strikes is actually very small it's an ultimate weapon that is used but anyone who goes on strike is making an enormous sacrifice they don't get paid they they suffer a great deal and as a result of it and so let's look at the causes of people being upset rather than the EMM symptoms well nikka an action policy packed interview this morning with Andrew Marr on the Falklands on Islamic State on secondary strike action and even on the idea that maybe we could keep Trident but just not put any missile warheads on the missiles yes I felt all nostalgic I was back to a teenager in the 1980s I remember these arguments in the early 1980s Michael foot put them in that manifesto for the 1983 general election now the point it was very less on the Falklands er he was very robust on the Falkland Islands absolutely he said he knew more about fascism than depth and DL who had told him not to side with Margaret Thatcher absolutely right I mean the point for Jeremy Corbyn is that he has a mandate from the Labour Party to put forward these arguments he had a 60% vote it is very clear what Jeremy Corbyn thinks about nuclear weapons he's been a member of CND since 1966 so he has a mandate the challenge for Jeremy Corbyn is to put forward these ideas in a way that appeals beyond those new members of the Labour Party to the electorate as a whole who have concerns about security of the nation for example he's talking about possibly having the successor submarines in the Trident system without nuclear weapons people look at that and say what's that about actually that's the Japanese system they talk about how in Japan there they have what is known as the bomb in the basement they're a non declared nucleus state but they could sort of arm themselves it with nuclear weapons within minutes if they needed to so that's what he's talking about sounds good in the Labor Party but he needs to sell that to the countries oh ah it's clear that a lot of what mr. carbon says has the support of the grassroots particularly the new ones that are joined the Labour Party it's equally clear that a lot of this does not have the support of the parliamentary Labour Party that's the the constant problem that has yet to be squared and I can't see a way that it will be squared and I don't think many of the Labour MPs can either I mean carbons problem and in a way it's an admirable one is that he's determined not to resign from things that he said in the past so for example on the Falklands he is being entirely consistent with what he was saying in interviews back in 2013 when he didn't actually matter and how he is now repeating those views the problem is that now Corbin does matter and actually we look at the Falklands the last time there was a vote of Falkland Islanders only three individuals voted to change the system of administration so he is way out of step with people living there on that one as well mr corbyn sets out his left-wing stall on these issues that's what he thinks and bit by big he's taking his time he's doing it as cutely he is taking the labour party in his direction that was part of the purpose I would suggest of this morning's interview yeah nobody can question his right and his political mandate to say what he says the question for me is how low is the labor vote floor now because if you go into a general election with a leader who says something like let's have the return of secondary picketing and that's not the most cockamamie idea in the manifesto he's also talking about renewing the Vanguard subs without having warheads on them I think you flirted with the idea of a so-called reasonable accommodation with the up with Buenos Aires over the Falklands if you go into an election on that ticket knowing that you have a white working-class base which is already flirting with you Kip how low can labour sink and for a long time I've believed as Isabel just said that no they can't get rid of him technically and constitutionally it's impossible but maybe politics is like water and it is finds a way to go around obstacles kind of these ideas of turn out to be very with the voters I think they'll turn out to be very popular with the the labor membership but every general election since 1983 would suggest to us over the last three decades that these ideas are outside the mainstream Jeremy Corbyn says no there is a new world out there I sort of tapped into that during my campaign thousands of people packing out those meetings well let's see you know we've got this electoral test in May let's see how these ideas go down outside the Labour Party we will indeed and we'll come back to that and more Oh Oh

12 thoughts on “'Back to the 1980s': BBC Sunday Politics' verdict on Corbyn's policy initiatives”

  1. Lo & behold, he lost the 2017 general election. A lot of confused people who struggle with reality seem to think he somehow won. They also think he'll win the next election. To do that, Labour has to hold on (numerically speaking) to every single seat they have right now, without losing a single one, and add an extra 65 seats on top of that, just to get a majority of one. This would require a nationwide swing of unprecedented magnitude, including in Scotland, where the SNP – although wounded – remain a formidable opponent. I'm not putting money on it.

  2. 4:42 wrong – these ideas have not proved unpopular in every election since 1983, because they have not even been on the table since 1983. We have been offered only Thatcherism or Blairism. A lot has changed since the eighties.

  3. Can't agree with the stereotypes used by ReganRocks, but the point is still well made. For whatever reason, because you believe – they are inherently stupid or they have been duped or because the media never tells them the truth; whatever you believe the cause is, its largely irrelevant. The reality is that Corbyn's views are not those of the majority of the UK working class of whatever ethnic background, and not those in particular of the white working class. The Tories are dismantling the achievements of Atlee, Wilson, Calaghan and yes, even the positive bits of Blair and Brown. And what does the Labour Party do? Try to piggy back onto issues the UK public do care about – like the NHS – with a whole load they don't care about – Palestine – and mix in a few things they would rather not like to confront – the morality of nuclear weapons – they don't want them because they have been told for 70 years they are basically immoral……but er yes they do if it guarantees their freedoms.

  4. Can't agree with the stereotypes used by ReganRocks, but the point is still well made. For whatever reason, because you believe they are inherently stupid or they have been duped or because the media never tells them the truth; whatever you believe the cause is, its largely irrelevant. The reality is that Corbyn's views are not those of the majority of the UK working class of whatever ethnic background, and not those in particular of the white working class. The Tories are dismantling the achievements of Atlee, Wilson, Calaghan and yes, even the positive bits of Blair and Brown. And what does the Labour Party do? Try to piggy back onto issues the UK public do care about – like the NHS – with a whole load they don't care about – Palestine – and mix in a few things they would rather not like to confront – the morality of nuclear weapons – they don't want them because they have been told for 70 years they are basically immoral……but er yes they do if it guarantees their freedoms.

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